Environmental Initiatives

Steve Kallick

Director, International Lands Conservation, The Pew Charitable Trusts

Steve Kallick

Email: skallick@pewtrusts.org

Address:
Washington

Steve Kallick is the director of the international lands conservation program at The Pew Charitable Trusts, where he has been since 1997.   Currently he oversees the International Boreal Conservation Campaign and the Outback Australia project and conducts research into wilderness conservation issues worldwide.   An expert in forest and wilderness conservation policy, Kallick has designed and launched several high-profile environmental initiatives for Pew, including the Heritage Forests Campaign;  the Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership; the Northeast Land Trust Consortium. 

Prior to joining Pew, Kallick worked for conservation organizations and government in Alaska.  Kallick holds both a J.D and a certificate in Natural Resources Policy from the Northwestern School of Law at Lewis and Clark College in Portland, Oregon.

News Room


  • Ontario Implements Canadian Boreal Forest Agreement

    • Jun. 28, 2012
    • OtherResource

    Ontario is the first Canadian province to incorporate a groundbreaking agreement between the forest products industry and conservation groups for the benefit of boreal forest lands.

    More

  • Scientists Urge Canada to Postpone Commercial Fishing in the Arctic

    • Apr. 22, 2012
    • MediaCoverage

    (The Globe and Mail) More than 2,000 scientists from 67 countries, including 551 from Canada, are calling for a moratorium on commercial fishing in the Arctic until research can determine what lies in waters that were once covered year-round by the polar ice cap and set sustainable catch levels.

    More

  • Canada's Boreal Forest: Why Does it Need Protection?

    • Jan. 6, 2012
    • MediaCoverage

    (Ecopolitology) If you’re wondering what a boreal forest is, you’re probably not alone. It is comprised of forested lands in the northern hemisphere that contain mainly coniferous trees and reside just south of the frozen tundra region near the pole. These forests are also referred to as taiga. In layman terms, it is one of the largest areas of forested land on the planet; sparsely populated, full of wildlife, and largely appreciated for its natural beauty.

    More

  • Good News Outweighs Bad for Canada's Boreal Forest in 2011: Report

    • Dec. 29, 2011
    • MediaCoverage

    (Vancouver Sun) In an unexpected departure from year-end environmental doomsaying, a leading Canadian conservation group has compiled a Top 10 list showcasing major gains in 2011 for the country's vast boreal forest.

    More

  • Ottawa Moves to Preserve Home for the Woodland Caribou

    • Jul. 13, 2011
    • MediaCoverage

    (Globe and Mail) The federal government is on the verge of completing a recovery plan for the woodland caribou, which has disappeared from the Maritimes and is losing ground in Ontario and the West as human development pushes further northward.

    More

  • X
    Sign In

    Member Sign In

    Forgot Password?
    Submit Not a Member? Join!
    X

    Forgot Password?

    Send Password Not a Member? Join!
    X

    Change Password

    X
    (All Fields are required)
    Send Message
    Share this on: