Environmental Initiatives

Karen Sack

Senior Director, International Ocean, The Pew Charitable Trusts

Karen Sack

Email: ksack@pewtrusts.org

Address:
Washington, D.C.

Karen Sack joined Pew in September 2009 as director of International Ocean Conservation. She manages the international marine program which includes projects that focus on ending overfishing in Europe, conserving sharks, tunas, deep-sea life, establishing large-scale marine reserves, and combating illegal fishing.

Before joining Pew, Sack was director of Greenpeace International’s Political Unit, and before that, head of their International Oceans Campaign. In 2004, Sack was the first person from a nongovernmental organization to speak at a regular session of the United Nations General Assembly, representing the concerns of over 60 organizations from around the world over the plight of our oceans. She has led and participated in NGO delegations to the International Whaling Commission, Antarctic Treaty meetings, U.N. Conventions on Biological Diversity and Climate Change, FAO Committee on Fisheries, U.N. Oceans and the Law of the Sea meetings and the UN Fish Stocks Agreement.

Sack holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of the Witwatersrand in South Africa. She also holds a master’s degree in international environmental law from the University of Cape Town in South Africa and a master’s degree in international political economy from the American University in Washington, D.C.

News Room


  • UN Tribunal to Weigh Flag State Duties to Stop Illegal Fishing

    • Dec. 23, 2013
    • OtherResource

    When a country registers a fishing vessel and allows it to fly that country’s flag, what are the government's responsibilities for that vessel's actions at sea? The answer to this question would seem to be simple, but it is no secret in the international fishing community that not all States govern their flagged vessels equally.

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  • Put the Brakes on Deep-Sea Fishing

    • Sep. 12, 2011
    • Opinion

    (Washington Post) The world’s deep-sea catch is steadily declining, and the high vulnerability of these fish populations and diverse marine ecosystems is well documented. Last year, officials from the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea declared that in the Northeast Atlantic, 100 percent of all targeted deep-sea species have been fished “outside safe biological limits.” Yet the fishing continues, via trawlers dragging enormous weighted nets that, in a single pass, scrape clean the ocean floor.

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  • The Port State Measures Agreement Implementation Toolkit

    • Sep. 9, 2010
    • FactSheet

    Ports play a major role in the fishing industry. They give vessels and crews access to essential services and supplies and enable vessel operators to offload their catch and transport it to market.

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  • Teleconference to Discuss the International Whaling Commission's Annual Meeting

    • Jun. 16, 2010
    • OtherResource

    A teleconference was held on Wednesday, June 16, 2010 by the Pew Environment Group, World Wildlife Fund and Greenpeace to discuss efforts to finally bring an end to the impasse between pro-whaling and anti-whaling countries in the International Whaling Commission (IWC) will be the focus of the IWC’s Annual Meeting, opening in Agadir, Morocco, on Monday, June 21.

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  • Shark Bycatch in Tuna Fisheries

    • Jun. 16, 2010
    • FactSheet

    Bycatch is one of the most vexing issues confronting the global fishing industry. It poses significant ecological, social and economic challenges.

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